The Lesson Anchor Charts Taught Me

Today I realized I need to share something that I see happening over and over in my classroom.
                 Very simple.
                          Very important.

      Kids really do ANCHOR back to Anchor Charts!

Weeks ago I was teaching a dyslexia intervention lesson and asked the students what approach stroke we would use for this new letter we were learning how to write in cursive.  They all (including myself) looked over to the spot in the top, left corner of my whiteboard where I had the approach strokes sketched out. Nothing fancy, but we knew they were there.  Except-they weren’t. They were cleaned over the weekend!

What got us laughing was the fact that we ALL looked there and then at each other in surprise. Doesn’t take very much to crack us up!  All fun aside, this meant something.  As a classroom teacher, my colleagues and I would always whine about how after we moved on from the concept on the Anchor Chart that the students created we didn’t have space to leave the charts up.  Okay, okay… if I am really honest, I do NOT do clutter.

(Side note: There are so many ways now to store them: Google Slides, Google Drive, Live Binders, etc. One way I chose that worked best for my classroom of students was the Magnetic Curtain Rod. This saved space and still allowed the students to anchor to a place they knew, and quickly.  Click here.)

Here are a few examples of how I used the magnetic curtain rod to hang anchor charts when we had limited space.

So this is why I must write this blog.  This morning while teaching another dyslexia lesson, when it came time to write our words I noticed the students anchoring back to the place where my writing letters used to hang.  At that moment it hit me.  I need to move them back to the original location.

Even though they have been in the new spot the entire year so far.
Even though I thought they fit better on the other side of the room.
Even though I was sure they could see them better on the other side of the room.

The truth is, once they had their anchor in a certain spot, this is where their eyes went back to every single time.  There is something to be said about the visible learning, visible thinking, visual aspect in remembering things.  Think about it, how many times have you covered things up and witnessed students looking up at that spot? How many times have you done the same thing when trying to recall information?!  I could go on forever about the research, but I just wanted to share a quick A-HA moment!

After moving them back to their original location during my lunch break my afternoon kids did smile a pretty big smile when they saw them. I noticed (even if they won’t admit it) that they looked right at them while writing!

This is not rocket science, friends.  I knew this, but I guess I never truly knew HOW important these Anchor Charts were until I found myself anchoring as well while teaching! I won’t even stop with Anchor Charts, ALL Thinking should be VISIBLE!

I will leave you with this advice: Don’t ditch the charts. 🙂  They may not be beautiful or clean looking (does this really matter?), but they really do make a difference in recall and securing the learning!

Just sharing my A-HA moment from my literacy room on this fabulous Tuesday!

Elementary & Secondary Teachers Sharing Best Practices….(gasp!)

This past week was our district Humanities Institute that ran 4 days!  You are probably thinking – What?!  Are you crazy? It’s the first week of summer break. Apparently, I am not the only crazy one because there were over 170 educators there to learn and teach incredible sessions!  

Let me tell you the best thing about this week.  Elementary and Secondary teachers shared best practices in the same room!  (gasp!)  That’s right, we all shared and learned together! It was professional learning, discussing, connecting, reflecting, and sharing across district from Pre-K to our Collegiate Academy! 
I want to publicly thank our fierce leader, Dr. Suzanne Newell, for taking this approach this week.  I am not sure if she realizes just how powerful this one little thing was.  As I listened to others and talked with people, the most amazing thing happened….we connected the dots between elementary and secondary.  This still is my most favorite quote because of how true it is!
  • Teachers in first, fourth, seventh and high school were sharing best practices they used that could help each other.
  • Teachers were meeting new teachers and putting a face to the name.
  • Teachers were exchanging emails and ways to communicate and connect their classes.
  • Teachers were developing empathy for other teachers…discovering that when we communicate we realize little things we may never have known before.
  • (The biggest, in my opinion) Teachers began to understand the links from elementary to secondary and the importance of common language and Common Instructional Expectations!  
We have heard of these Common Instructional Expectations many times, but SEEING exactly how they begin in kinder and extend all the way through was incredibly powerful!  Having time to discuss with others and time to reflect made all the difference in securing this learning.  
I know this might seem obvious, simple, and you might already do this….but if you think about it, there are not many opportunities that place Pre-K through HS in one room to learn together and share vertically how things apply.  Powerful!  So incredibly happy I was able to be part of this and learn so much!  I walked away from this week with many new connections, more secondary knowledge than I came in with and how to start connecting elementary and secondary goals so that we can transition our students effortlessly.
One of the most amazing educators I have the privilege of learning from in my tribe is Bethany Hill.  You can find her on Twitter  @bethhill2829  This quote came from her and how true it is.  
I just posted an article by @SaneeBell about leadership at all levels and how much she learned from being given the opportunity to be an elementary principal when she had only known secondary.  As she exits she feels she is a better educator having spent her last few years in elementary learning so much!  It was a great connecting thought for me as I thought about how much elementary and secondary already do that is similar and could really help one another if we verbalized these connections with our students.  It also made clear how we could tweak a few little things to help our students even more.  All it took was communicating in the same room with others and developing a strong personal learning network right here within our amazing district! 
I look forward, even more now than ever, to the awesome things to come in GCISD.  Thank you Dr. Newell!  🙂